White Clover

 White Clover

White Clover

White clover is the most important pasture legume. It is a highly palatable, nutritious forage for all classes of livestock. White clover is commonly planted with orchardgrass, ryegrass, or tall fescue. Ladino clover grows tall enough to be harvested for hay, silage, and green chop. Intermediate and small white clovers seldom grow tall enough to be harvested for hay or silage.

Management

Management for forage is aimed at maintaining 40% to 50% clover. Close grazing (2 inch stubble height) favors clover, whereas light grazing favors grass. Well-fertilized grass will outgrow clover in fall and winter and could smother the clover. Spring applications of nitrogen will stimulate grass and provide early feed, but excessive rates are detrimental to the clover stand. Phosphate applications are broadcast in fall or spring according to soil tests. Sulfur, boron, or magnesium may be needed for maximum production on some soils in the western part of white clover’s range.


  • Price:
  • Seeding Rate (lbs per acre): 2-4                                                                
  • Seeding Date:  April-May
  • Seeds per Pound: 768,000
  • Planting Depth: 1/4" - 1/2" deep

     Note: Late summer and fall seedings should be conducted while adequate moisture is still in the soil to assure establishment before freezing.